Tag Archives: Reptiles

That’s Amoure–Turtle Version

Photo of two African sulcata tortoises mating, taken by TurtleWife reader Roberta R. at the San Diego Zoo a few years ago. She says:  “The whole zoo was watching!”

The box turtles at our house have, well, time on their hands. Here’s how they fill some of it.

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Filed under Reptiles, Tortoises, turtle lovers, Turtle Pets, Turtles, Uncategorized

Turtle Plastrons

Turtle plastrons–or turtles’ bottom shells, can be pretty amazing. Take a look at these beautiful patterns and colors.

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Filed under Terrapins, Uncategorized

At the Reptile Expo

Reptile Expo Floor

Reptile Expo Floor

Before leaving work on Friday, I mentioned to my boss that Allen and I were going to be selling herp chotchkas at a reptile expo on Sunday.

My boss, a non-herper, looked bemused. What is a reptile expo? she said.

To answer the question:

It’s a convention hall (in this instance the White Plains County Center) where aisle upon aisle of snakes, lizards, frogs and turtles (as well as spiders, hissing cockroaches, and miscellaneous other animals) are sold for sums ranging from $10 to $10,000.

Most of said animals are displayed in plastic takeout containers or cages, like these snakes.

snakes under glass

snakes under glass

Iguanas are kept in wire mesh cages.

Iguana up for adoption

Iguana up for adoption

Chameleons are also usually displayed in cages. But sometimes, they’re allowed to hang out on a tree branch.

Just hanging around

Just hanging around

Bearded dragons, that neither slither nor leap, are shown off for sale in oversized Tupperware tubs or in fish tanks.

Juvenile bearded dragons basking

Juvenile bearded dragons basking

Large beardies happily ride around on an arm, shoulder or other part of the anatomy — before and after purchase.

John from the Long Island Herp Society

John from the Long Island Herp Society

Unconventional traveller

Unconventional traveller

Geckos come in takeout containers.

Not our natural habitat

Not our natural habitat

You’ll find frogs in fish tanks.

Dart frogs

Dart frogs

Turtles in tanks and tubs.

Red eared sliders

Red eared sliders

Then there’s all the paraphernalia necessary to feed –

Snake food

Snake food

Packaged food

Packaged food

House –

Critter cages

Critter cages

And maintain your herp collection:

Mostly, I just enjoy looking at the people and the herps.

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Filed under chameleons, frogs, geckos, lizards, red eyed tree frot, reptile expo, Reptiles, snakes, Terrapins, Tortoises, Turtles

Can Turtles and Iguanas Be Friends?

Yellow Foot Tortoise & Iguana

Yellow Foot Tortoise & Iguana

This was a question I’d never thought to ask – until yesterday, when Allen and I visited our friend AJ, an iguana rehabber. We see AJ at every reptile show at the Westchester County Center in White Plains, NY. (Another show coming up this Sunday, July 13.)

She’s usually there with one or more iguanas who need homes, along with Merlin, an iguana who has the run of her Connecticut home, which she shares with her husband, two sons and approximately 35 other iguanas. (I didn’t get an exact read on the lizard population — the number may be higher, though I doubt lower.)

Just as many turtle lovers start out with one turtle, AJ started with one iguana, a birthday present from her family 12 years ago. Then, a friend wrote a story for a local publication about her iguana, and included AJ’s phone number. “The phone hasn’t stopped ringing since,” says AJ.

I knew that we’d be seeing a large number of lizards; I just didn’t realize that AJ also keeps turtles, tortoises (and frogs). Or, that her tortoises coexist quite nicely with her iguanas, as you can see, above and below.

The iguanas also coexist (for the most part — gotta separate the dominant males) very well with each other. And many enjoy a swank picture window habitat.

The turtles in our house should have it so good!

Fast friends

Fast friends

Red Foot Tortoise and Iguana
This is the life!

This is the life!

Habitat

Turtle & Iguana Habitat

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Filed under iguanas, Turtles, Uncategorized