Tag Archives: Terrapins

Turtle Wife’s Newsletter Nov-Dec 2014

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Confessions of a Turtle Wife is
Free on Kindle Nov 9 through 11

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Turtle Wife’s free newsletter,
TURTLE STORIES, NEWS & VIEWS,
is published bi-monthly, on no set date.
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of the stories below and more. Turtle news
posted daily! Also follow Turtlewife
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WORLDWIDE TURTLE STORY ROUNDUP

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galapagos-tortoise

Photo: James P. Gibbs, SUNY-ESF

NEAR-EXTINCT GALAPAGOS ISLAND TORTOISES
MAKE COLOSSAL COMEBACK

by Tanya Lewis, Staff Writer. Oct. 28, 2014

Giant tortoises that were once driven to the brink of extinction
on a tiny Galápagos island have made an amazing comeback,
a new study reveals.

The tortoise population on the island of Española dwindled to
just 15 animals in the 1960s, because of damage to their
habitat caused by feral goats. Then, about 40 years ago,
captive-bred tortoises were released on the island, and now
there are about 1,000 of them living and breeding in the wild.

“It’s one of the greatest conservation success stories,” said
James Gibbs, a conservation biologist at the SUNY College
of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, New York.
Gibbs led the study published today (Oct. 28) in the journal
PLOS ONE.

READ MORE.

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28 tortoises smuggled into UK are now
living at Blackpool Zoo

Known as the Sulcata Tortoises, these tiny creatures
are all under a year old and just a few inches long. But
within time, these relatively rare tortoises could get as
big as 10 stone and live up to a whopping 100 years.

“We have built a fantastic relationship with Borderforce
over the years and work closely with them to rehome
any seized reptiles,” John Paul Houston, assistant head
of the Animal Department at Blackpool Zoo, said.

Read more.

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Boom in shipments of turtles overseas could lead to
protective measures.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. government is proposing a

new level of protection for certain freshwater turtles,
concerned that a massive increase in overseas demand
for the reptiles could hurt their long-term prospects.

The proposal from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service involves
four species: the Florida softshell, the smooth softshell,
the spiny softshell and the common snapping turtle.

While none of the four species is at risk of extinction,
federal officials and biologists say that a booming international
trade in turtles had prompted concerns about the animals’
long-term survival.

Read more.

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Reptiles play vital role in protecting ecology

Hitherto viewed by many here and elsewhere as
an insignificant part of the fauna of the Blue Mountains,
reptiles have of late been generating considerable
interest among not only wildlife enthusiasts and students of
wildlife biology but also the public on account of growing
awareness about their role in protecting this ecologically
fragile area.

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sulcata

Mystery of missing giant tortoise has happy ending
in Daytona Beach

Nicholas Montagna was flummoxed.
One of his two giant tortoises went missing Sunday, leaving
Montagna, his family, neighbors and other in the community
searching for answers, and for Cecil. And even though the
100-lb-plus tortoise is safe and sound once again, his
disappearance remains a mystery.

Read more--about yet another sulcata tortoise lost
and found.

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Burma_female

Northern River Terrapin Acquired
in Myanmar

Efforts to save the critically endangered Northern
River Terrapin (Batagur baska) in Myanmar recently took
a great leap forward when the TSA/Wildlife Conservation
Society (WCS) Turtle Team was granted permission to
transfer a large adult turtle living in a pagoda pond to
more equitable quarters.

The pond, at Botataung Pagoda in downtown Yangon, has
been home to the turtle since at least 1987, but probably
longer. Although its origins remain clouded in mystery, we
suspect the turtle was brought from the lower Ayeyarwady
Delta many years ago and released into the pond by a traveling
pilgrim. The symbolic release of fish, turtles, and small birds
is commonplace at Buddhist temples throughout Asia; by
liberating a captive animal, a person is believed to earn
karmic merit.

Read more.

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Here’s a quiz I never expected to see:
Which species of sea turtle are you?
I got Green Sea Turtle. Ed.

safe_image.php

Where do you fit in with the seven species of sea turtles?
Find out from the experts at Sea Turtle Conservancy…

Community Post: Which Species Of Sea Turtle Are You?
http://www.buzzfeed.com

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safe_image.php

A Turtle Mystery in NY’s Jamaica Bay

Something strange is happening to the diamondback terrapin
turtles of Jamaica Bay, though there’s some question as to
precisely what that strange thing means.

“Nobody has ever seen anything like this before,” said Russell
Burke, a Hofstra University ecology professor and one of the
foremost experts on Jamaica Bay’s population of diamondback
terrapin turtles, the largest concentration in the state.
“It’s a puzzle.”

Read more.

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Lonesome George, Immortalized
Natural History Museum Displays
a Giant Tortoise

Extinction is forever, as the conservationists say.
Desiccation, it turns out, is only nearly so.

The giant Galápagos tortoise known as Lonesome George,
whose death in 2012 signified the end of his subspecies,
has been preserved for posterity in a one-of-a-kind effort
by expert taxidermists. But the work took about half a
year longer than expected, in large part because the tortoise
stubbornly refused to dry out.

“That’s always the great unknown, how long the animal
will take to dry,” said George A. Dante Jr., whose studio,
Wildlife Preservations, in Woodland Park, N.J., was given the
task of preparing the 170-pound, five-foot-long tortoise.
Lonesome George — now fully dry and fully preserved, posed
as if he were looking for his favorite food, cactus — is on
display until early January at the American Museum of Natural
History, one of the partners in the effort.

Read more.
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Now available as e-books:

index


Why Being a Reptile Lover Means Always
Having to Say “I’m Sorry
.”

And:

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You Know You’re a Herper
WHEN YOU DREAM IN GREEN

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*** ORGANIZATIONS THAT HELP TURTLES ***

HERPDIGEST: A Weekly Electronic Newsletter on the
Latest News on Reptile and Amphibian Science and
Conservation. A nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.
Allen Salzberg, Editor/Publisher www.herpdigest.org

THE NEW YORK TURTLE & TORTOISE SOCIETY:

A nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to the
conservation, preservation of habitat, and the promotion
of proper husbandry and captive propagation of turtles and
tortoises.  www.nytts.org

TURTLE RESCUE OF LONG ISLAND: A non-profit
501(c)(3) organization that works to rehabilitate native
turtles and find homes for those that cannot be released.
Also takes in and adopts out turtles and tortoises of all
species that can no longer be kept for whatever reason.
Location, Long Island, New York www.turtlerescues.org

INDIANA TURTLE CARE in New Palestine, Indiana, is
a nonprofit organization dedicated to rehabbing
injured and unwanted turtles. www.indianaturtlecare.com
Contact: zooperior@comcast.net

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Free Nov 9, 10 & 11, 2014!

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CONFESSIONS OF A TURTLE WIFE:
The story of a turtle-challenged marriage.
Read Chapter 1 at www.turtlewife.com.

214 pages. Paperback at Amazon or B&N.

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Turtle Wife’s Newsletter
(c) 2014 Turtlewife.com

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Turtle Plastrons

Turtle plastrons–or turtles’ bottom shells, can be pretty amazing. Take a look at these beautiful patterns and colors.

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At the Reptile Expo

Reptile Expo Floor

Reptile Expo Floor

Before leaving work on Friday, I mentioned to my boss that Allen and I were going to be selling herp chotchkas at a reptile expo on Sunday.

My boss, a non-herper, looked bemused. What is a reptile expo? she said.

To answer the question:

It’s a convention hall (in this instance the White Plains County Center) where aisle upon aisle of snakes, lizards, frogs and turtles (as well as spiders, hissing cockroaches, and miscellaneous other animals) are sold for sums ranging from $10 to $10,000.

Most of said animals are displayed in plastic takeout containers or cages, like these snakes.

snakes under glass

snakes under glass

Iguanas are kept in wire mesh cages.

Iguana up for adoption

Iguana up for adoption

Chameleons are also usually displayed in cages. But sometimes, they’re allowed to hang out on a tree branch.

Just hanging around

Just hanging around

Bearded dragons, that neither slither nor leap, are shown off for sale in oversized Tupperware tubs or in fish tanks.

Juvenile bearded dragons basking

Juvenile bearded dragons basking

Large beardies happily ride around on an arm, shoulder or other part of the anatomy — before and after purchase.

John from the Long Island Herp Society

John from the Long Island Herp Society

Unconventional traveller

Unconventional traveller

Geckos come in takeout containers.

Not our natural habitat

Not our natural habitat

You’ll find frogs in fish tanks.

Dart frogs

Dart frogs

Turtles in tanks and tubs.

Red eared sliders

Red eared sliders

Then there’s all the paraphernalia necessary to feed –

Snake food

Snake food

Packaged food

Packaged food

House –

Critter cages

Critter cages

And maintain your herp collection:

Mostly, I just enjoy looking at the people and the herps.

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Filed under chameleons, frogs, geckos, lizards, red eyed tree frot, reptile expo, Reptiles, snakes, Terrapins, Tortoises, Turtles